• LONG-SHARP GALLERY

    INDIANAPOLIS

     

    Long-Sharp Gallery (LSG) specializes in works on paper, multiples, and drawings by modern and contemporary masters including Picasso, Miró, Francis, Frankenthaler, Gilliam, Warhol, Haring, Indiana, and Lichtenstein.

     

    In addition, LSG is dedicated to a contemporary program that incorporates paintings, photography, and sculpture, as well as conceptual and multimedia art by a growing roster of regional, national, and international artists. The gallery exclusively represents in the U.S. or beyond an impressive roster of artists including the Estate of David Spiller, Tarik Currimbhoy, Cha Jong Rye, Dale Enochs, Jason Myers, Sabina Klein, Spiller + Cameron, Amy Kirchner, Sylvestre Gauvrit, and Patrick Hurst, among others.

     


  • Keith Haring (b. 1958 – d. 1990), Untitled, 1984
    Sumi ink on paper
    Unframed: 86 x 122 cm.
    Framed: 110.4 x 144.7 cm.
    Hand signed on reverse
    Price: $480,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

    Authenticated by the Estate of Keith Haring; certificate on file with Long-Sharp Gallery

     

    Provenance:
    Artist.
    John Buckley, Australia.
    Marcello Mostardi, Florence, Italy.
    Private Collection, Italy.

     

    Exhibitions:
    Curitba, Brazil, Museu De Arte Contemporanea do Paranà Seec Curitiba, American Graffiti, 1998; this exhibition later travelled to Fun- dacao Clovis Salgado, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; Museu de Arte Moderna Mam Bahia, Bahia, Brazil; Museu De Arte Moderna Rio De Janeiro, Brazil; Istituto Cultural Itau Sao Paolo, Brazil (catalogue).

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol (b. 1928 – d. 1987), Keith Haring and Terry Toy, 1984

    Unique gelatin silver print
    Unframed: 25.4 x 20.3 cm.
    Framed: 44.5 x 40.6 cm.
    Price: £15,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (FL06.00015)

    Provenance:
    The Estate of Andy Warhol (stamped).

     

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol (b. 1928 – d. 1987), Keith Haring and Unidentified Man, c. 1984

    Unique gelatin silver print
    Unframed: 20.3 x 25.4 cm.
    Framed: 40.6 x 44.5 cm.
    Price: £15,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (FL06.01126)

     

    Provenance:
    The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped

     

     

     

  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery
     

    Andy Warhol (b. 1928 – d. 1987), Sitting Bull, 1986

    Screenprint in colours on Lenox Museum Board
    Unframed: 91.4 x 91.4 cm.

    Framed: 102.2 x 102.2 cm.
    Price: $60,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (UP 100.186)

    Reference number: FS IIIA.70


    Provenance:
    The Estate of Andy Warhol (stamped).

     

    Long-fascinated by the culture of the American West, Andy Warhol released his “Cowboys and Indians” series – the portfolio was one of the last major series completed before Warhol’s death in 1987. Ten portraits were chosen for the series, including John Wayne, George Custer, Annie Oakley, and Apache leader Geronimo. A portrait of Sioux Chief Sitting Bull was also considered for the portfolio; it was ultimately replaced by another portrait and never published in the regular edition.

     

  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery
     

    Patrick Hurst, Questa è Acqua, 2021

    Marine-grade stainless steel (from a unique series of 5)

    152 x 100 x 70 cm.

    Price: $75,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

     

     

    According to the artist: Water is fundamental to humans - as a species, we are made of 50-75% water. In the contemporary world, where people are inwardly focused and strongly divided in opinions on many topics, ‘This is Water’ suggests bubbles rising in water, acting as a symbol for our shared experience. The name of the sculpture comes from a speech, later turned into a book of the same name, by the late American writer David Foster Wallace. Here he highlights the importance of choice in how we see and think about the world around us. If we are able to choose to go beyond our snap judgments, we could see the world in a whole new light, we could see the marvelous possibilities that exist all at once and the universal joys of the human experience. In this speech Foster Wallace remarks that “...if we choose how to think and how to pay attention, it’ll be within our power to see a hot, slow, consumer hell type situation as not only meaningful but sacred.”

     

     

     

  •  

    Spiller + Cameron, Puriel, 2021

    Paper bags, canvas tote bags, remnants of paint-smeared rags, monoprint

    42.9 x 35 inches

    Price: $8,500 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    Spiller + Cameron’s “Angels” reflect their latest series of paintings, capturing all elements present in previous iterations: rescued painters’ rags, paper bags from Moira’s time in NYC in the 1980s, paint swatches and panels sewn together to create the final masterpiece.

     

    The artists constructed the Angels series in 2020-2021, each painting taking on its own personality… “large totemic faces… with battle scars, tattoos, and body-art markings.” This piece in particular is named after Archangel Puriel, the “fire angel.”

     

    Provenance:

    From the artists' studio to Long-Sharp Gallery.

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol, Female Fashion Figure, Circa 1960
    Ink and graphite on paper
    19.5 x 10 in (49.5 x 25.4 cm)
    26.75 x 17.75 in (67.9 x 45 cm) framed with museum plexI

     

    This work is believed to be a study drawing for a publication in Vogue (December 1959)

    *All 11 fashion drawings, together as a set: 110,000 USD, detailed below

     

    Warhol expressed an interest in fashion from an early age – one of his early jobs in college was arranging window displays in department stores. “When you think about it, department stores are kind of like museums,” Warhol mused while creating window displays at one such department store, reflecting on his appreciation of fashion and its influence on his work.

     

    Many of Warhol’s drawings from the 1950s focused on fashion, including depictions of shoes, purses, necklaces, and gloves. His first job in New York City at Glamour Magazine stemmed from commissioned work on shoes; art directors from other publications came to learn of Warhol’s work, intrigues by his whimsical style of drawing. He later revealed his talent for drawing other accessories – handbags, jewelry, perfume bottles and sunglasses.

     

    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped
    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (ARD 406.006)

     

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol, Boot with Butterfly, Circa 1954

    Ink and colored paper collage on paper

    4.5 x 4 in (11.4 x 10.2 cm)

    13 x 14 in (33 x 35.6 cm) framed with museum plexi

     

    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (ARD 411.003)

     

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol, Shoes, Circa 1954

    Ink on paper

    13.375 x 11.625 in (33.97 x 29.53 cm)

    16.25 x 16.25 inches (41.3 x 41.3 cm) framed with museum plexi

     

    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 320.002)

     

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol, Shoes, Circa 1954

    Ink on paper

    11.5 x 12.625 in (29.2 x 32.7 cm)

    16.25 x 16.25 inches (41.3 x 41.3 cm), framed with museum plexi

     

    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 320.003)

    Andy Warhol, Jewelry Drawing, Circa 1956
    Ink and graphite on paper
    5.25 x 4.75 in (13.3 x 12.1 cm)
    13.75 x 13.25 in (34.9 x 33.6 cm) framed with museum plexi
     
    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped
    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 342.153)

     

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol, Scarf, 1958

    Ink and graphite on paper

    11.5 x 9.25 in (29.2 x 23.5 cm)

    16.25 x 14 inches (41.3 x 35.6 cm), framed with museum plexi

     

    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 326.018)

    Andy Warhol, Fashion Drawing, 1955
    Ink and graphite on paper
    13.25 x 10.25 inches (33.7 x 26 cm)
    15.75 x 15.25 inches (40 x 38.7 cm), framed with museum plexi
     
    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped
    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 342.187)
     
    Harper’s Bazaar 10/1955, pg 164-165

     

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol, Fashion Drawing, Circa 1954

    Ink and graphite on paper

    10.25 x 12.5 in (26 x 31.8 cm)

    15.5 x 17.25 inches (39.4 x 43.8 cm), framed with museum plexi

     

    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 328.072)

     

     

     

  •  

    Andy Warhol, Glove, Circa 1958

    Ink, tempera and graphite on paper

    11.5 x 15.25 inches (29.2 x 38.7 cm)

    18 x 18.5 inches (45.7 x 46.9 cm), framed with museum plexi

     

    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped

    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 342.039)

     

    Published in the New York Times (6/14/58)

     

     

     

  • Andy Warhol, Purse, Circa 1954
    Ink, graphite, watercolor and tempera on paper
    11.75 x 13.5 in (29.8 x 34.3 cm)
    20 x 20 inches (50.8 x 50.8 cm), framed with museum plexi
    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped
    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 342.057)

     

    Andy Warhol, Fashion Drawing, 1955
    Ink and graphite on paper
    11.875 x 6.75 inches (30.2 x 17.1 cm)
    15.25 x 13.25 inches (38.7 x 33.7 cm), framed with museum plexi
     
    Provenance: The Estate of Andy Warhol, stamped
    Authenticated by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, stamp and archive number on verso (TOP 342.192)
    Harper’s Bazaar 10/1955, pg 164-165
     

     

     

     

  • Mel Bochner, Blah, Blah, Blah, 2020
    Monoprint in oil with collage, engraving and embossment on handmade paper
    27 x 22.5 inches (68.6 x 57.2 cm)
    29.5 x 24.5 inches (74.9 x 62.2 cm), framed
    Signed and dated (on front, upper left)
    Price: 38,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)
     
    Provenance: From the printer to Long-Sharp Gallery

    Mel Bochner, Amazing, 2017
    Monoprint with engraving and embossment
    12 x 9 inches (30.5 x 22.9 cm)
    14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm), framed
    Signed in pencil
    Price 28,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)
     
    Provenance: From the printer to Long-Sharp Gallery

     

     

     

     

  • Left: Tarik Currimbhoy, Eclipse (Bronze)
    Brushed and polished bronze, kinetic*
    From the edition of 11 plus proofs
    14.5 inches in diameter x 2.5” at its thickest point (36.8 x 6.3 cm)

    Price: 12,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    The inspiration for this piece is a planetary eclipse, when the sun and moon move towards and away from each other. The circle is tapered to its minimum width at the top, like a stretched rubber band, but kept heavy at the bottom, so that it rocks creating a kinetic movement. I think of the bronze sculpture as the solar eclipse, and the steel as the lunar eclipse.

     

    The bronze sculptures are cast, using ancient techniques of lost wax. The mold is made of sand, bonded by the juice of a sugar cane plant. With all the “feeders”, each sculpture weighs three times its weight. It is heated, cracked open, and then the mold is destroyed. In fact, although the bronze and brass pieces are available from an edition (usually 7 or 11), each piece is actually a unique piece which cannot be exactly replicated.

     

    *These works are kinetic – they are solid bronze. (The artist also works in stainless steel.) By solid, that is to say that there is nothing “weighted” or magnetic about them – they are just perfectly balanced and constructed to rock once “tapped”. They will continue rocking until physics slows them to a stop. Each comes with a polishing kit to wipe the sculpture in case of fingerprints.
     

    Right: Tarik Currimbhoy, Swirl

    Brushed and polished bronze, kinetic*

    From an edition of 11 plus proofs

    15 x 14.5 x 2 inches (38.1 x 36.8 x 5.1 cm)

    Price: 16,000 USD (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    The inspiration for the Swirl is a shell, sliced to see the beauty of its structure. Each rib of the Swirl has its own density and form. The curl in the Swirl distributes its weight, so that it rises and falls as it moves, dictated by the pull of gravity. This creates a marriage of negative and positive forms swaying.

     

    *These works are kinetic – they are solid bronze. (The artist also works in stainless steel.) By solid, that is to say that there is nothing “weighted” or magnetic about them – they are just perfectly balanced and constructed to rock once “tapped”. They will continue rocking until physics slows them to a stop. Each comes with a polishing kit to wipe the sculpture in case of fingerprints.