• VESSEL GALLERY

    LONDON

     

    The Authority on Contemporary Art Glass & Ceramics. Specialising in Museum quality Sculptural Artworks and Lighting.

     

    Founded in Notting Hill, London in 1999 Vessel Gallery aims to be a major destination for all those who appreciate contemporary art-glass sculpture and decorative lighting. From the stunning simplicity of Scandinavian crystal, via flamboyant Italian art glass, to the best of British and International creative talents, all pieces are unique or limited edition and have been carefully edited to show an unparalleled selection of contemporary design and craft.
     

    For further details on the artworks offered for sale by Vessel Gallery in the Eye Viewing Room please make an enquiry below.

     

  • Bram Bogart, De Sombre Grijzen, 1964. Vigo Gallery
  •  
    Philip Baldwin (b. 1947) & Monica Guggisberg (b. 1955), Deep Red Twilight Trio / From Species Novae series
    Handblown and cut glass (Each unique)
    Deep red Twilight I: H: 51 cm.; D: 16 cm.
    Deep red Twilight II H: 61 cm.; D: 20.5 cm.
    Deep red Twilight III H: 67 cm.; D: 13 cm.
    Price: £25,500 set 3 / £8,500 each inc. 20% VAT
     
    Baldwin (1947, New York) and Guggisberg (1955, Bern) have been working together since 1980 with a purity of form and vivacity of colour bringing together Scandinavian and Venetian glassmaking techniques.
     
    The list of museums and collections which have acquired their works is long and impressive. Individual showings, as well as participation in group shows, have given them opportunities to present their works at leading galleries and in major museums in Europe, Japan and the United States and their works rank among the best to be found in the international glass art scene.
     
    Over the years they have become more sculptural in focus, while seeking to imbue their work with a deep connection to archetypal forms and shapes, and striving for the highest level of craftsmanship. They address eternal symbols of human culture and history, while embracing contemporary evolution in form and meaning.
     
    In recent years large installations and major exhibitions in public spaces, such as Canterbury Cathedral, UK in (2018) and more recently The Glasmuseum Ebeltoft in Denmark (2020-2021) increasingly reflect their concerns for the shared world of our times, highlighting some of the challenges while continuing to express their love for beauty in form and object.
     
    About the Species Novae series
    A series whose shapes draw on an older history and tradition, while playing with light and attenuated lines. These works address the search for finding the right balance between society and individuals, as expressed in their creativity of form, as well as through their strength as a group. They are a celebration of glassmaking, using the Venetian incalmo technique together with battuto cutting, the signature of Baldwin and Guggisberg’s work
     
    Public Collections
    Achilles Stiftung, Hamburg D • Alexander Tutsek Stiftung, München, D • American Craft Museum, New York, USA • Berner Design Stiftung, CH • Canterbury Cathedral, UK • Carnegie Museum of Art, Piitsburgh, USA • Castello Sforzesco, Milano, I • Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, USA • Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, USA • Denver Art Museum, Denver, USA • Die Neue Sammlung, München, D • Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv, IL • Ernsting Stiftung Alter Hof, Coesfeld-Lette, D • Fond Cantonal de Beaux Arts, Lausanne, CH • Fond Cantonal de Décoration, Genève, CH • Gewerbemuseum Winterthur, CH • Glasmuseum Ebeltoft, DK • Glasmuseum Hentrich, Kunstpalast Düsseldorf, D • Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, USA • Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo, J • Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, USA • IMA, Indianapolis Museum of Art, USA • Kunstsammlungen der Veste Coburg, D • Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile Alabama, USA • Mudac, Lausanne, CH • Musée Ariana, Genève, CH • Musée des arts décoratifs, Paris, F • MusVerre, Sars_Poteries, F • Museo del Vetro Murano, I • Museum für Gestaltung, Zürich, CH • Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Berlin, D • Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg D • Museum of Fine Arts Boston, USA • Palm Springs Art Museum, USA • Raccolta Arte Applicata Castello Sforzesco, Milano, I • Swiss National Collection of Applied Art, CH • The Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, USA • VitroCentre, Romont, CH • Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine, USA
     
    Awards
    2018 The Architects Award, Campaign for the Protection of Rural Wales • 2017 Glass in Venice Price 2017 • 1999 “Grand Prix des arts Appliquées 1999”, de la Fondation Vaudoise pour la promotion et la création artistique, Lausanne • 1998 Federal Commission for Applied Art, Switzerland • 1997 Bavarian Stateprize, (Goldmedal), Munich, Germany • 1994 IKEA Foundation (Schweiz) • 1990 Prix « Jeunes Créateurs », de la Fondation Vaudoise pour la promotion et la création artistique, Lausanne • 1988 Commission for Applied Art, Canton of Bern • 1985 Departement of Agriculture, Industry and Trade, Canton of Vaud

     

  • Chris Day (b. 1968), Under the Influence I

     

    Chris Day (b. 1968), Under the Influence I

    Handblown & sculpted glass with micro bore copper pipe, copper wire and rope (Unique)

    H: 46 cm.; D.: 25 cm

    Price: £3,900 inc. 20% VAT

     

    Growing up in the West Midlands, Day (b; 1968, UK) has become Britain’s only black glassblower, or certainly the only one that the artist is aware of. He creates highly personal works in glass and mixed media and his intention is to discuss and investigate the treatment of black people in Britain & the USA, with much of his research focussing on the history of the slave trade in the Eighteenth Century and the events leading to up & during the Civil Rights Movement.

    The Under the Influence series was made specifically for Harewood House in Leeds, forms the focal point in the exhibition curated by Vessel director Angel Monzon. It is inspired by the discovery of twenty-eight bottles of Harewood Rum from the plantations in a cellar in 2011. The Harewood bottles were sold in 2013-14, and the proceeds donated to the Geraldine Connor Foundation. Day’s bottle sculptures are designed to remind us of the importance of rum in the slave trade and its particular significance for Harewood.

     

    On each bottle is a cap made out of rope, instead of a cork stopper, to evoke the sensation of being bound, as the Africans were when they were shipped over to the Caribbean to harvest the sugar from which the rum was made. The trails of blue glass wrapped around the bottles lend them an exquisite richness, which also suggests the Atlantic Ocean. The sculptures are very heavy; as Day makes them, he says, ‘I feel as though I’m putting all my anger, all my emotions into them, not only mentally, but physically.’

     

    The title is a play on the idea of rum as strong alcohol with the ‘influence’ of the slave trade over contemporary society, to the extent that this barbaric practice was hardly questioned, even by the church. The work also reminds us that slavery continues today, albeit in the shadows.

  • Chris Day (b. 1968), Under the Influence II

     
    Chris Day (b. 1968), Under the Influence II
    Handblown & sculpted glass with micro bore copper pipe, copper wire and rope (Unique)
    H: 47 cm.; D: 24.5 cm.
    Price: £3,900 inc. 20% VAT
     
    Growing up in the West Midlands, Day (b; 1968, UK) has become Britain’s only black glassblower, or certainly the only one that the artist is aware of. He creates highly personal works in glass and mixed media and his intention is to discuss and investigate the treatment of black people in Britain & the USA, with much of his research focussing on the history of the slave trade in the Eighteenth Century and the events leading to up & during the Civil Rights Movement.
     
    The Under the Influence series was made specifically for Harewood House in Leeds, forms the focal point in the exhibition curated by Vessel director Angel Monzon. It is inspired by the discovery of twenty-eight bottles of Harewood Rum from the plantations in a cellar in 2011. The Harewood bottles were sold in 2013-14, and the proceeds donated to the Geraldine Connor Foundation. Day’s bottle sculptures are designed to remind us of the importance of rum in the slave trade and its particular significance for Harewood.
     
    On each bottle is a cap made out of rope, instead of a cork stopper, to evoke the sensation of being bound, as the Africans were when they were shipped over to the Caribbean to harvest the sugar from which the rum was made. The trails of blue glass wrapped around the bottles lend them an exquisite richness, which also suggests the Atlantic Ocean. The sculptures are very heavy; as Day makes them, he says, ‘I feel as though I’m putting all my anger, all my emotions into them, not only mentally, but physically.’
     
    The title is a play on the idea of rum as strong alcohol with the ‘influence’ of the slave trade over contemporary society, to the extent that this barbaric practice was hardly questioned, even by the church. The work also reminds us that slavery continues today, albeit in the shadows.

     

  • Maria Bang Espersen (b; 1981), Curved Line in Bronze

     

    Maria Bang Espersen (b; 1981), Curved Line in Bronze

    Hand sculpted glass (Unique)

    H: 20.5 cm.; W: 44 cm; D: 30 cm

    Price: £5,500 inc. 20% VAT

     

    Maria Bang Espersen (b; 1981, Denmark) works around the idea that all things are malleable, like glass, and that nothing can be permanently defined. Her experimental sculptures are therefore not only an approach but also a statement; one that states to never get caught up in the restrictive norms or to obey established hierarchies. Essentially, her works in glass, are a play with the possibilities of the material and an attempt to expand the viewer’s understanding of her chosen medium. Although static and solid in their final sate, Espersen stretches, pulls and bends her glass, resulting in works that appear soft and almost possible of languid movement. Her chosen candy confectionery colour palette entices and draws the onlooker towards the artwork, which deliciously glisten. Espersen studied glass and ceramics at Engelsholm Højskole, in Denmark, continuing her studies at the Kosta School of Glass in Sweden, The Royal Danish Academy of Design, and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Maine. She has exhibited extensively throughout Europe and the USA, where she has also participated in several residencies, whilst winning numerous prizes and nominations.

     
     
  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery

     
    Nina Casson McGarva, Infinity
    Cast and sculpted glass (Unique)
    H: 40 cm.; W: 56 cm.; D. 36 cm.
    Price: £5,000 inc. 20% VAT
     
    Nina Casson McGarva was born in Gloucester in 1990, but grew up in a community of makers near Nevers, France. She trained at the Ecole Nationale du Verre Jean Monnet, a technical college for workers in crystal glass factories, and at the Glass and Ceramics Workshop on Bornholm, part of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. She has undertaken residencies at Pilchuck Glass School and Starworks Glass Lab, US, and with Nobuyasu Yoshida in Kobe, Japan. She was formerly an intern for Baldwin and Guggisberg, and an assistant to the glass sculptor Sally Fawkes. Her work was shown at the British Glass Biennale 2019, in 2020 at London Glassblowing’s Young Masters and in Es Grünt, Galerie Handwerk, Munich, and at Collect 2021; it currently features in Habatat’s 49th international glass exhibition.
     
    In her own words about her work: ‘The starting point in my work is nature. I take a detail of an element I find in nature and use it as an inspirational base to create my own abstraction, that then builds into a complex sculpture.
     
    My inspiration comes from cycles of nature that I associate with glass because to me the material goes through a cycle and is at it’s most alive when it’s hot and being transformed. The end result is solid and doesn’t move a,ny longer, it is at the fragile time before disintegration and maintains a dynamic form and rich structures such as dry leaves, feathers or sea shells. In the making process I shape it hot in an open kiln until the glass stops moving. When the glass transforms to be a solid, the piece is finished’.

     

  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery

     

    Nina Casson MacGarva, Murmur

    Cast and sculpted glass (Unique)

    H: 46 cm.; W: 52 cm.; D: 30 cm.

    Price: £5,300 inc. 20% VAT

     

    Nina Casson McGarva was born in Gloucester in 1990, but grew up in a community of makers near Nevers, France. She trained at the Ecole Nationale du Verre Jean Monnet, a technical college for workers in crystal glass factories, and at the Glass and Ceramics Workshop on Bornholm, part of the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. She has undertaken residencies at Pilchuck Glass School and Starworks Glass Lab, US, and with Nobuyasu Yoshida in Kobe, Japan. She was formerly an intern for Baldwin and Guggisberg, and an assistant to the glass sculptor Sally Fawkes. Her work was shown at the British Glass Biennale 2019, in 2020 at London Glassblowing’s Young Masters and in Es Grünt, Galerie Handwerk, Munich, and at Collect 2021; it currently features in Habatat’s 49th international glass exhibition.

     

    In her own words about her work: ‘The starting point in my work is nature. I take a detail of an element I find in nature and use it as an inspirational base to create my own abstraction, that then builds into a complex sculpture.

     

    My inspiration comes from cycles of nature that I associate with glass because to me the material goes through a cycle and is at it’s most alive when it’s hot and being transformed. The end result is solid and doesn’t move any longer, it is at the fragile time before disintegration and maintains a dynamic form and rich structures such as dry leaves, feathers or sea shells. In the making process I shape it hot in an open kiln until the glass stops moving. When the glass transforms to be a solid, the piece is finished’.