• VIGO GALLERY

    LONDON

     

    Vigo represents emerging and established international artists, curating shows in both the public and private arenas.

     

    They have placed numerous historic and contemporary works in the collections of prominent museums enjoying good relations with many Museums and Foundations including TATE Modern, The British Museum, MoMA, The Ashmolean Museum, Sharjah Art Foundation, The Arts Council and The Metropolitan Museum.

     

    For further details on the artworks offered for sale by Vigo Gallery in the Eye Viewing Room please make an enquiry below.

     

  • Bram Bogart, De Sombre Grijzen, 1964. Vigo Gallery

     

     

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    Ibrahim El-Salahi (b. 1930), Meditation Tree, 2018

    Polished aluminium

    68 x 54 x 46 cm

    Edition 1 of 8

    (V03546)

    £65,000 (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    Born in Sudan in 1930, Ibrahim El-Salahi is one of the most important living African artists and a key figure in the development of African Modernism.

     

    El-Salahi grew up in Omdurman, Sudan and studied at the Slade School in London. On his return to Sudan in 1957, he established a new visual vocabulary, which arose from his own pioneering integration of Sudanese, Islamic, African, Arab and Western artistic traditions.

     

    Tate Modern’s 2013 retrospective of El-Salahi’s work was the Museum’s first exhibition dedicated to Africa Modernism. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Art Institute of Chicago; The National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; The British Museum, London; Tate Modern, London;

    The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, UAE; The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford; Newark Museum, Newark; Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah; The National Gallery, Berlin and many others.

     

  • Stephen Chambers, State of the Nation (3), 2017, Vigo Gallery

    Bram Bogart (b. 1921 – d. 2012), Agglomeration, 1959

    Homemade paint (pigment, oil, glue, watercolour) on canvas
    95.3 x 158 x 5 cm.
    Price: £125,000 (plus any applicable taxes)
     
    Bram Bogart was dedicated to exploring the materiality of paint. Like Burri and Fontana, he challenged and blurred traditional notions of painting and sculpture, building three dimensional paintings comprised of mostly natural ingredients including various oils, glue, pigment, powdered chalk, and water. This investigation into the sculptural possibilities of paint led him to use increasingly thick layers, to create nuanced textural surface, exploring balance and disorder, tension and calm, two- and three-dimensionality, colour and structure.

    Bogart refused to be pigeon holed into any school or grouping yet he was an artists’ artist, exchanging works with his contemporaries Schoonhoven and Fontana. Where Fontana broke the plane by slashing and gauging, Bogart, more than any other pushed outwards towards the viewer, using paint as a sculptural medium. As a young man his heroes were Rembrandt, Permeke and Van Gogh, and later on inspiration came from Mondrian and Van Der Leck. This lineage of lowland painters is very much evident in his work. 1960 was the last year Bogart was able to use stretched canvas before the paint became too heavy, requiring thereafter the use of reinforced wooden supports. From mid 1961 on, Bogart starts to paint on the floor  and the works begin to look like his hero and fellow countryman Van Gogh’s brush strokes, but enlarged a thousand fold. This golden period lasts until about 1965 producing some of his most outstanding contributions to the history of painting.

    When first confronted with a Bogart, the effect is immediate. In 1965 Fontana wrote ‘For many years now I’ve met the painter Bogart in Paris, and yet I can not forget the impression that I had when watching his paintings the first time when I saw them in his studio’. Previously, in 1959 after exhibiting with Bogart, Niki de Saint Phalle was so blown away by the pregnancy of the white surface of his painting ‘Reine des Tauraux’ that she was inspired to create her famous shotgun paintings where she violently pierced thick plaster, releasing coloured paint buried within. I personally will never forget seeing them for the first time aged about twelve and immediately rushing off to make my own versions with pigment and poly filler. Bogart makes you want to paint. His works sometimes feel like they were created by an aesthetically astute giant with a suitably large range of utensils for flattening, extruding and brushing cake icing. New observers seem to search for comparisons like this, trying to make sense of the volumus matter, the like of which they may not have encountered. For the most part Bogarts are made of solid home made paint, the colour within and on the surface, referred to by Wim Beeren, Director of Museum Boijmans as a ‘concretion of colour’, a sort of structural polychromy, rendering the painting not merely abstract colour/s but abstract coloured structure.

    To understand the progression of Bogart’s paintings one can think of them in terms of a linear, logical almost inevitable progression of the exploration of his medium.

  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery

     

    Justin Williams (b. 1984), Silent Music, 2021

    Mixed media on canvas

    142.5 x 123.5 cm

    £ 9,000 (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    ‘I didn’t want to go down my past explorations directly looking at cults and local folk stories, but rather ask myself the question as to why I am so fascinated with these people and the lives they have decided to live outside of the norms of society. I wanted to look at my own family blood line as my grandparents are migrants from Egypt and moved to Australia during the war. Growing up in Australia I was never really aware of their full story and it was something that wasn’t discussed as if embarrassed by our heritage.

     

    I have never fully felt I have a part of any certain group or social situation in my home town Melbourne. In these paintings I’m trying to depict both the transitions of my grandparents migration from Egypt to Australia, and also my own outsider feelings towards both the notations of place and time as well as hidden normality’s within a group and an individual.’

  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery
     

    Stephen Chambers (b. 1960), Portrait of Licorice Mackechnie, 2021

    Oil on board
    58 x 48 cm.
    Price: £12,000 (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    British painter and printmaker Stephen Chambers lives and works in London and Berlin. Chambers has won many scholarships and awards, including The Mark Rothko Memorial Trust Award. Besides his usual practice, Chambers has also collaborated on three dance projects with the Royal Ballet.

     

    Chambers most recent major project was The Court of Redonda, a large portrait series shown first during the 2017 Venice Biennale, and subsequently at The Heong Gallery at Downing College, Cambridge.

     

    Other exhibitions include The Big Country & Other Stories at the Pera Museum in Istanbul (2014) and The Big Country at the Royal Academy of Arts, London (2012). In 2015 he was awarded an Honorary Fellowship by Downing College, Cambridge University and in 2005 he was elected Royal Academician, Royal Academy of Arts, London.

     

    His work is held in many major national and international collections. He is a Trustee of both The Koestler Trust and The Bryan Robertson Trust.

  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery
     

    Spiller & Cameron, Moroni, 2021

    Acrylic on assembled cloth
    110 x 89 cm.
    Price: £ 6,229 (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    Spiller and Camerons’ Face Paintings are essentially sewn masks made up of painted fragments created over many months, the main focus of which is a playful examination, exploration and deconstruction of the matter of abstract painting, drawing and mark making. The panels are put through endless additive and reductive processes on material ranging from canvas tote bags to paper and linen with the aim of finding satisfying new patinas of colour, material and texture.

     

    Each named after an Angel, the Faces although abstract are something still recognisable to all humanity as a concept. Faces can define or conceal character, attract or repel the viewer, communicate emotional responses and act as barometers of beauty. Most people don’t see these paintings as faces at first - they are almost secondary to the appreciation of the painting acting as a structure from which experimentation can take place.

     

    Constantly challenging their construction skills by meticulously de-assembling and re-assembling various materials and mediums, the sewn panels amalgamate prior actions, thoughts and techniques in one surface and integrate personal signifiers to make one overall image. Each panel differs from the next; blending paper bags, canvas tote bags, sacks, swatches of paint smeared rags, and combining these surfaces with acrylic, charcoal, chalk, oil pastel, pencil, ink, and ephemeral paper notes. Using broken symmetry as a guideline, areas are laboriously puzzled together, lined up, and often cut apart and remade if the alignment is incorrect.

     

    Spiller and Cameron’s collaborative practice is one of extraordinary balance made possible by the pairs shared history and mutual appreciation for the others values and aesthetics.

  • Ibrahim El-Salahi, The Tree, 2003. Vigo Gallery
     

    Ibrahim El-Salahi (b. 1930), Untitled , 2008

    Pen and ink on paper
    29.7 x 21 cm.
    Price: £26,000 (plus any applicable taxes)

     

    Born in Sudan in 1930, Ibrahim El-Salahi is one of the most important living African artists and a key figure in the development of African Modernism.
     

    El-Salahi grew up in Omdurman, Sudan and studied at the Slade School in London. On his return to Sudan in 1957, he established a new visual vocabulary, which arose from his own pioneering integration of Sudanese, Islamic, African, Arab and Western artistic traditions.
     

    Tate Modern’s 2013 retrospective of El-Salahi’s work was the Museum's first exhibition dedicated to Africa Modernism. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Art Institute of Chicago; The National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; The British Museum, London; Tate Modern, London; The Guggenheim Abu Dhabi, UAE; The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford; Newark Museum, Newark; Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah; The National Gallery, Berlin and many others.